Human Rights Documentary FREE SPEECH FEAR FREE Film Screening

 

FREE SPEECH FEAR FREE Film Screening

Echoing the 8th Human Rights Documentary Film Festival, HKUSU collaborates with Amnesty International Club @HKU and Amnesty International Hong Kong this year in organising a movie screening session on campus. We hoped that it could provide more insights into the human right issues.

Details of film screening are as follows:

Date: 26/10/2018 (Friday)
Time: 7:30-9:30pm
Venue: CBA, G/F, Chow Yei Ching Building, HKU
Running Time: 79 minutes
Fee: Free
Language: English (English and Chinese subtitles)
**The film to be screened in the event is rated as IIA and not suitable for children.**

The post-screening discussion will be conducted in English.

Synopsis:

Freedom of speech is seen to be at grave risk in Hong Kong. It is not uncommon to protests emerge against the diminishing press freedom, or the ban on political parties. What are the greatest threats to it in our current society, and does the West take this freedom for granted? Tarquin Ramsay unravels these questions in this ambitious documentary film, which started at the age of 15, through interviewing high school students of his age, CIA whistleblowers, English actor Jude Law, editor of WikiLeaks Assange, Belarus cultural workers, British journalist Sarah Harrison who once assisted Snowden in his whistle-blowing campaign, C-BASE, media artist and free-speech activist Diani Barreto, and his 11-year-old daughter. Through their words, the documentary Free Speech Fear Free witnesses their courage and unflinching efforts in defending our freedom of speech enshrined in Human Rights

“Our ability to communicate is important because from it derives everything that we think about as civilized in a civilization, every law, every regulation, every constitution and in fact every other right derives from the practice of communicating with each other.”

Julian Assange, in Free Speech Fear Free.

This film was the DOCUTAH Raven winner for Best Foreign Film.

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/182409230

Post-screening discussants:

Ms. Lamia Sreya, the President of Equal Opportunity Student Ambassador
Born and raised in Hong Kong, Lamia is currently a year 4 undergraduate student at the University of Hong Kong pursuing a double major in American Studies and Criminology. Having grown up as an ethnic minority here due to her Bangladeshi roots, Lamia has experienced the diverse yet exclusionary duality of Hong Kong and wishes to work towards greater social integration of these communities.

She has organised and assisted in campaigns for women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, and anti-police brutality campaigns when she was the General Secretary of the Amnesty International Club at HKU, which is affiliated with Amnesty International Hong Kong.
As of now, Lamia is the President of the Equal Opportunities Student Ambassador Club at the University of Hong Kong. Her role focuses on providing equal opportunities to all students in HKU by mobilising the support of external organisations to offer and engage in more voluntary services.

Mr. Davin Wong, the President of the Hong Kong University Students’ Union, session 2018
Davin Wong is the President of the Hong Kong University Students’ Union, session 2018. Prior to his presidentship, he was a popularly elected Union Councillor and a member of the Current Affairs Committee in the Union Council. Mr Wong is currently a Year 3 LLB student.

Ms. Charlotte Wong, member from the Seeing Politics
Ms. Charlotte Wong, representative of Seeing Politics, is a year four student who as well has greatly engaged in social participation. She has served a social research scheme on social housing and has completed an internship at several NGOs. She is currently helping out in Asia Monitor Resource Centre, a renowned NGO fighting labour rights in Asia.

Seeing politics is a Facebook page created by a group of Government and Public Administration students from CUHK. With jail costumes, the members spoke for the political prisoners in the July 1 March. They are also active participants in social movements. Other than that, Seeing Politics also produced variegated posts relating to political issues. It also features several social incidents to explain related political concepts, such as the moral theory behind ticket scalping of Dayo Wong’s stand-up comedy show, and political philosophy concepts entailed in the ‘contract’ of sponsored chicken wings broken by the HKUST student. Rather than ‘enlightening’ the public, Seeing Politics is always happier to share what they have learnt and exchange views with the mass, hoping to connect ‘politics’ and ‘daily lives’, eventually to raise people’s interest in politics.

Should you have any enquiries, please contact us at hkusmnesty@gmail.com or contact PANG Ka Ho, the Vice-President (External) of the Hong Kong University Students’ Union (email: jordanpang.asterism@gmail.com).